Analysis: ‘Less worse is the new excellent’

“Less worse is the new the excellent.”

Those are the words of contemporary wisdom that economist Anirban Basu shared with the Howard County Chamber of Commerce at a breakfast this week. “The recession is now over,” Basu declared, although to hear the business people talk of tightening belts, you wouldn’t know it. “We’re losing jobs half as quickly” as we were earlier in the year, Basu said. “The major problem is male unemployment." He said the steepest job losses nationally have been in male-dominated industries, such as construction and manufacturing.

Analysis: Yes, there are nonpartisan primaries

On Tuesday, I did something I have not done in 10 years: Vote in a primary election. Since I was 18, I’ve always been registered to vote, and I’ve voted every chance I was given. However, since I started working as a reporter almost a decade ago, I have not been registered as a member of any political party.

Analysis: Open mike: Live from Annapolis, its the Board of Public Works

State government really has reached a new level of transparency with the live webcasting of video from the Board of Public Works. The participants will clearly take some getting used to the presence of robotic cameras and microphones which follow the sound of speech. They picked up a number of personal conversations on today’s webcast.

Analysis: Crabs and candidates get steamed in Crisfield

The weather was hot and humid, the crabs were warm and spicy, and the politicians and their supporters were sweating buckets. It was a typical annual Tawes Crab and Clam Bake. The big name politicos spend most of the time reaching out to voters and posing for photos, rarely touching a crab or clam.

Analysis: Kendel Ehrlich predicts ugly campaign

Former Maryland first lady Kendel Ehrlich told a group of Republican women Wednesday that the campaign pitting her husband, ex-Gov. Bob Ehrlich, against Democratic Gov. Martin O’Malley “is going to be ugly.”

Analysis: Health planners say Md. needs better info on reform

Marylanders need better access to primary care doctors and more information about their medical choices, according to a group of doctors and nurses, insurance companies, and business groups advising the state about how to implement federal health care reform legislation.