Opinion: If you value educators, pay them fairly

To be a teacher these days, we are also social workers, counselors, life coaches, and frontline health responders to Prince George’s County Public School (PGCPS) kids, every day, in our classrooms and in the halls of our schools, says Prince George’s County teacher Yvonne Baicich in an opinion piece we publish to mark the national Teacher Appreciation Day.

Bob Bauman remembers publisher Ralph Hostetter

In his 97 years, Ralph Hostetter, in pursuit of his many interests, personal and business, touched many lives for the good.  He was my friend and the editorial support of his newspapers contributed greatly to my political success. 

Opinion: Baseless attacks on the restaurant industry

The Restaurant Association of Maryland responds to Progressive Maryland’s commentary attacking its polling and credibility. When Larry Stafford of Progressive Maryland implies that the Restaurant Association of Maryland (RAM) is deceptive with regard to the arguments we make to policymakers, writes Melvin Thompson, I have to draw the line. His attack is baseless, unwarranted and shows he has little understanding of business economics.

Opinion: It’s time to create a Prescription Drug Affordability Board

Across Maryland, people struggle to pay for the prescription drugs they need to lead healthy lives or even stay alive. Prices keep going up, while drug companies spend more on marketing and reap enormous profits. That’s why we are sponsoring legislation to create a Prescription Drug Affordability Board that will have the authority to review and set fair and affordable maximum drug costs in the state.

In West Baltimore for MLK Day: Too cold to march, but still honoring the dead

It was deemed too frigid Monday afternoon for the peace march from St. Bernadine’s parish in West Baltimore to walk the few blocks around the church where eight people, including a 7-year-old girl, were shot and killed just in the past year. Instead, in honor of Martin Luther King, we sang and prayed and listened to Archbishop William Lori. He condemned racism and acknowledged the complicity of the church in supporting it, including several of his 19th century predecessors who owned slaves themselves.