Comptroller Peter Franchot

Franchot flips out over standardized testing contract

Gov. Hogan said, "I share a lot of concerns that the comptroller has with respect to Pearson, PARCC, and over-testing. We still think we're over-tested." Hogan noted that he had signed into a law a commission to study and make recommendations about the amount of testing in public schools. "Everything [Franchot] said, I agree with," Hogan said. But "if we don't do it, it could be worse."

Baltimore aerial photo by the Greater Baltimore Committee

Adding 9,200 jobs in July gives Marylanders reason to celebrate, economist says

Job numbers released on Friday (Aug. 21) gave Marylanders a reason to celebrate this past July’s activity. The revision of the June job numbers moved figures from an initial loss of 6,200 jobs between May and June to a loss of 3,400 jobs. However, July preliminary job estimates reported a 9,200 job increase from June to July.
Maryland’s economy has grown significantly since July 2014, adding an estimated 53,700 jobs to payrolls.

Laptop computer by mmole on Flickr

Md. savings on new standardized school tests are questioned

This fall, as Maryland schools enter a third year using the Common Core curriculum, state education leaders are touting a trend toward big savings on annual testing. But out in the field, some in local districts say they are not so sure about the thrift.

Housing Secretary Ken Holt, left, addresses MACo session, with Economic Development Secretary Mike Gill, right, and Sen. Ed Kasemeyer, moderator.

Rascovar: Hogan’s Holt Problem

Maryland Housing Secretary Ken Holt may be a nice guy, a financial expert, a former member of the House of Delegates from Baltimore County, a cattle rancher and a breeder of thoroughbred race horses, but he has turned himself into a giant liability for Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, Jr.

Gov. Larry Hogan and cabinet members meet with the members of Maryland's congressional delegation in March.

Questioning Md. Democrats’ new found religion on redistricting reform

Professor Todd Eberly writes: In response to Gov. Hogan's call for redistricting reform, Democratic members of Maryland's congressional delegation have argued instead for national reform. Forgive me for not placing much stock in Maryland Democrats' new found redistricting faith. Rather I think they are calling for national reform in an effort to provide cover for state Democrats who don't want to give up the power to pick and choose their voters.