School scoring bill sent to Hogan, who promises veto

Democrats in the Maryland General Assembly on Tuesday passed legislation establishing parameters for school evaluations that the state school board strongly opposes and Gov. Larry Hogan has promised to veto. The House went along with Senate amendments, and sent the bill to Hogan, who called it “an utter disgrace.” If the bill is delivered to Hogan’s office by Monday, he has six days to act on it, giving the legislature the chance to override a veto before it adjourns April 10.

Opinion: Why energy efficiency is good for Maryland’s economy

Good policies like the one that launched the state’s EmPOWER Maryland energy programs in 2008 can create thousands of jobs and save businesses billions of dollars, while also saving you money every time you pay your electricity bill. These are among the reasons why the Maryland Alliance of Energy Contractors is urging Gov. Larry Hogan to sign legislation that would extend EmPOWER Maryland for six more years.

Opinion: Baltimore’s ‘most elegant’ new community not fit for a fish

It has been his joy and anguish through the last five decades to keep track of little Dipping Pond Run, a rare and trouty tributary of Baltimore’s central drainage way, the Jones Falls, says environmental writer Tom Horton. He details the fate of brook trout and other trout that might be wiped out by development.

Opinion: Opioid epidemic requires treatment for addicts

The opioids addiction epidemic sweeping this country is staggering. It’s a travesty, and it doesn’t discriminate. It affects us all. A big part of dealing with this overwhelming issue is to support and encourage people addicted to opioids to seek professional medical help on their path to recovery.

Opinion: It’s great to be a gangster in Maryland!

Open borders. Marijuana. Relaxed rules on bail, lifer parole, and criminal sentencing. Anti-police legislators. It’s great to be a gangster in Maryland! Aspirations to make Maryland a sanctuary for undocumented migrants are getting rave reviews from the “maras” and the transnational human trafficking cartels which smuggle men, women, and children into our state.

Trump and Clinton voters in Maryland followed 2012 pattern

By William G. Rothstein

For MarylandReporter.com

The reasons for the election of Donald Trump as president can be better understood by an analysis of voting patterns in Maryland counties. Hillary Clinton received 60% of the total Maryland vote and President Trump 36%. However, 17 of the 24 Maryland counties voted for Trump and 7 voted for Clinton. An analysis of the counties that voted for each candidate found little influence of campaign issues and little change in voter behavior compared to the 2012 presidential election. Maryland is distinguished by the great variety in its regional economies.

Collins: “Trust Act” means flouting immigration law

By Michael Collins

For MarylandReporter.com

Many communities in Maryland are openly flouting federal laws regarding immigration by establishing themselves as “sanctuary cities,” and, by doing so; they are creating a troublesome precedent. These “sanctuary cities” often prohibit their police from notifying federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) if they have detained an illegal immigrant. They encourage local police not to turn over illegal immigrants in their custody to federal officials because they might start deportation proceedings against them. The stated purpose of these policies is to make illegal immigrants feel safe and welcome.  That they thwart the enforcement of duly enacted federal immigration laws—and that immigration policy is the exclusive bailiwick of the federal government—doesn’t enter into the mix. Nor, it seems, do broader public safety concerns.  The news frequently includes stories about illegal immigrants who were protected by these policies going on to commit crimes—often with tragic consequences.

Opinion: Marijuana legalization should not be held hostage to drugged driving concerns

Maryland lawmakers are once again considering legislation to regulate the adult use and sale of marijuana to those age 21 or older. Nearly six in 10 residents support this reform, according to a February Goucher poll. But opponents charge that doing so could pose a risk to traffic safety. Such concerns are not all together unfounded, but deserve to be placed in proper context.