Columbia at 50 Part 11: Recreation and the Role of the Columbia Association

Keeping a sports facility open that runs consistently at a big loss may seem like a poor financial decision. Yet it is completely consistent with the original philosophy behind the Columbia Association. As Columbia got started, every one of the amenities and facilities ran at a loss, not to mention the debt it took to build them. As Columbia looks to the future, CA not only wants to keep the pools and athletic facilities open, but to keep Jim Rouse’s vision alive.

Hogan strategy on Trump budget cuts works — Let Congress do its job

Gov. Larry Hogan’s strategy on President Trump’s budget apparently worked: Shut up and let the Maryland’s members of Congress do their job. Democratic officials and party leaders had demanded the Republican governor stand up to Trump and resist plans to cut funding for Chesapeake Bay cleanup, medical research at the National Institutes of Health, and funding for the Affordable Care Act. Hogan said it was up to Congress to act on the president’s budget, and a spokesman said the governor would act if and when the cuts actually happened.

Fed up with Annapolis, McDonough sets sights on Towson executive

Delegate Pat McDonough has “had it with the legislature,” he said. “It will be torture for me even to go back for the last session,” said the populist conservative from Middle River in Baltimore County. Now the four-term delegate has set his sights on the Towson courthouse, hoping to become county executive for Maryland’s third largest county that has turned more Republican over the past decade, particularly on its east side.

Columbia at 50 Part 10: Arts at the Heart of the New Town

This is the 10th part in a series of 12 monthly essays leading up to Columbia’s 50th birthday celebration in June. The Merriweather Post Pavilion was one of the first structures built before Columbia even had its first residents. Now it is being redeveloped and is at the center of the Merriweather District that is part of Columbia’s new downtown. But Merriweather is only part of the arts scene in the planned community.

A session ‘we can all be proud of,’ Hogan, Busch, Miller agree

By Capital News Service and MarylandReporter.com

“It was a great session,” Gov. Larry Hogan said about the just closed 90-day meeting of the Maryland General Assembly. “This is the way government is supposed to work…. This was all about compromise.” “It was a session we can all be proud of,” House Speaker Michael Busch, sitting next to Hogan at a bill signing ceremony Tuesday morning. “This year your staff did a great job.”

Hogan chooses not to fight legislature on 15 bills, including attorney general powers

Republican Gov. Larry Hogan has chosen not to fight the Democrat-dominated legislature on 15 bills they sent to him early, expecting vetoes on some. The most surprising among the 15 bills Hogan let go into law without his signature is HB913, forcing the governor to put $1 million a year in the budget of the attorney general in order to sue the Trump administration. Hogan had called the bill “horrible” and “crazy.”

Anne Arundel moves closer to elected school board

After years of resistance, the Anne Arundel County senators voted Friday for a fully elected school board, approving a bill that has already passed the House of Delegates. Anne Arundel County has had one of the last three school boards in Maryland totally appointed by the governor after a nominating process. The measure must still be approved by the Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee and the full Senate.

Paid sick leave bills “dead in the water,” Hogan says, promising veto

The paid sick leave bills making their way through the legislature “are dead on arrival” if they reach his desk, Gov. Larry Hogan declared Wednesday. He promised reporters “I will veto them immediately” because they have the potential to kill thousands of jobs and “are disastrous for our economy.” This story compares who is covered in the legislative proposals and Hogan’s own bill.

Columbia at 50 Part 9 ENVIRONMENT: Respecting the Land While Building a City

“To respect the land” was one of the four basic goals for Columbia often repeated by developer James Rouse more than 50 years ago as he pitched his proposal “to build a complete city” on 14,000 acres of farmland, woods and stream valleys. The goals seem almost a contradiction. If he wanted to “respect the land,” why not just leave the fields and forest as they were? Because they were not going to stay that way for long as suburban development spread from Baltimore and Washington along the new interstate highways.