Maryland State Board of Elections

Legislators consider improving Md. election security after hearing with state elections board

Legislators learned last week that Maryland’s electronic balloting system may need better security measures to protect voters’ information and that the lawmakers must be the ones to add those protections. The State Board of Elections told lawmakers Sept. 6 that they are powerless to make those changes, and that any security changes must directly come from the legislature.

Ocean City businesses fear losing 4,000 seasonal workers if J-1 visa program is cut

As the summer tourism season comes to a close in Ocean City, Maryland, many businesses fear they may soon lose much of their seasonal workforce if the Trump administration cancels the J-1 visa program. The White House may be considering reducing the J-1 visa exchange visitor program, which brings in more than 100,000 students from foreign countries to the U.S. each summer, often to work in tourist destinations like Ocean City

Maryland Divided Part 5: Can Salisbury and small enclaves make rural Maryland cool?

This is the last part of a five-part series on the divide between rural Maryland and the rest of the state. People are dying faster than they’re being replaced in rural Maryland, and where they’re not the numbers are trending that way. So retaining residents and attracting new ones is vital, and cities like Salisbury, Frederick and Cumberland — small urban anchors in Maryland’s rural areas — could be where the revitalization begins.

Maryland Divided Part 4: Can solar, aquaculture supplant Big Chicken?

This is the fourth in a five-part series about the divide between rural Maryland and the rest of the state. The old economic mainstays of crop farming, raising chickens and catching fish and crabs provide jobs and preserve the Eastern Shore’s character, but all three industries face economic pressures that make their future uncertain.

Maryland Divided Part 2: Western Maryland fracking fight reveals divergent economic visions

This is the second part in a five-part series examining the divide between rural Maryland and the rest of the state. Allegany and Garrett, the state’s two westernmost counties, tend to be lumped together as “Mountain Maryland,” their problems similar, their prospects equally muddled. But the two counties’ economic issues — and their approaches to solving them — differ starkly.

Maryland Divided Part 1: Rural counties hope to gain political clout

The first in a five-part series in the divide between rural Maryland and the rest of the state. Earlier this year when Gov. Larry Hogan took the stage in Annapolis at P.A.C.E., a conference dedicated to Western Maryland, he opened with the following: “When I was sworn in two years ago, I said the war on rural Maryland was over — and I meant what I said.”

Pedestrian casualties mount in Langley Park as officials defer action

At least 138 pedestrians have been struck by vehicles in the past eight years on a lethal two-mile stretch of state highway that runs through Langley, Park Md., a low-income immigrant community in the Washington suburbs. Eight have died. A Capital News Service analysis of state accident data from 2009 through 2016 documented the casualties on University, a roadway that officials say wasn’t designed for the largely immigrant walking community now living along it in Prince George’s County. (It’s a long story, but worth the slog comparing what happened in College Park with what has not happened in Langley Park.)

Comptroller seeks more powers to combat tax fraud

Legislation supported by Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot and Gov. Larry Hogan would give new powers to the comptroller’s office to combat tax fraud. Testifying Tuesday before the House Judiciary Committee, Franchot, a Democrat, asked lawmakers to “give me the power to make a difference here.” At a summit he hosted last month, Franchot said it’s “an existential threat to our agency that tax fraud is increasing.”

State House Democrats propose legislation aimed at Trump policies

Democratic lawmakers in Annapolis announced five priorities Tuesday aimed at resisting policy efforts by President Donald Trump’s administration and the Republican-controlled Congress. One would withdraw all of Maryland’s past calls for a constitutional convention, another would direct the attorney general to oppose “harmful” federal policies, two would create commissions to monitor health and financial regulatory developments at the federal level, and the fifth would instruct the state’s congressional delegation and governor to resist any effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act.