Del. Angel will challenge ex-Del. Griffith for Currie’s Senate seat

Freshman Delegate Angela Angel plans to challenge four-term former Delegate Melony Griffith in the Democratic primary for the Prince George’s County Senate seat held by retiring Sen. Ulysses Currie. Angel, a lawyer who has worked on legislative policy, says her record as a first-term delegate and her ability to get things done make her the better choice. Angel, 37, said she plans to officially announce her candidacy in mid-November.

Former MoCo Council aide, now candidate, critical of former bosses

For 11 years, Neil Greenberger sat behind a desk at the Montgomery County Council Office Building in Rockville, talking about county policy and presenting the council’s side of the story as its legislative information officer. Now Greenberger is running for the council himself as an at-large candidate and he’s not pulling any punches when it comes to discussing how he thinks the council needs to shape up. “There’s been too much of telling people what they need and a lot less of listening to what voters want,” Greenberger said.

First Republican in 2018 MoCo elections earns matching campaign funds

Montgomery County Council District 2 candidate Ed Amatetti is the first Republican among seven approved candidates to earn matching public campaign funds in the 2018 Montgomery County elections. To date, the state election board, which manages the Montgomery County program, has disbursed $850,000 in matching public campaign funds from an $11 million fund appropriated by the council.

Democrats running for governor rarely mention Martin O’Malley

Six Democrats running for governor used Larry Hogan as a reliable punching bag at a Saturday forum, pounding away at the current Republican governor in front of an auditorium filled with progressive Montgomery County Democrats. But prominently mentioned only once during the two-hour face off was the two-term Democrat whom Hogan replaced and whose policies the candidates largely agreed with — Martin O’Malley.

Our poll was about the state of public thinking, not a prediction

The central argument in Mr. Rascovar’s piece is that a poll taken in mid-September can’t predict what will happen in June 2018. You will get no argument from me, or any other pollster, on this point. Polls can tell you the current state of a race or opinion toward a policy or elected officials during the time the survey is fielded, but can’t tell you what the public will be thinking in the future. The purpose of our poll was to find out where Democratic voters are at now—in mid-September—not to say where they will be in June 2018. 

Rascovar: Warning to voters: Beware of polls 

Too many Americans look upon polls as Gospel, the definitive word on how elections will come out. Wrong. Polls can be useful at times but only as an indicator of the shifting winds of public sentiment. They cannot predict accurately the outcome because polling is an art, not a science.

Young Turks challenge Prince George’s incumbent delegates

A group of young Democratic challengers in their 20s and 30s has emerged in Prince George’s County to run for the House of Delegates in 2018 and take on incumbent Democrats. The challengers cite a need for fresh blood and new ideas in a delegation they say has gotten out of touch with the voters and ineffective at getting things done.