State Roundup, December 8, 2015

Following a Sun report on continuing lead paint problems, lawmakers call for tougher enforcement; Maryland beekeepers seek labeling, restrictions in effort to stave off colony collapse; policing panel urges shortening time for police officers to respond to internal probes; Saylor commission releases report on training police in disability awareness; business panel mulls targeted tax hikes; College Park President Loh suggests changing name of Byrd Stadium; Emily’s List backs Peña-Melnyk; and more Baltimore City pols line up for Van Hollen.

Crabs a plenty, candidates few at annual Tawes feast

The crabs and clams were plentiful, but the candidates were in short supply at 39th annual Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield Wednesday in this off-election year. The only items usually baked are the thousands of crab pickers, but Crisfield was mid-80s and breezy. Here’s a photo gallery.

Okinawa: The Final Battle Revisited

In 1995, these old men have returned to the site of the final battle, where many lost their youth, their innocence, their buddies.
Little they saw of Okinawa today is what they have seen these past 50 years in their vivid, often painful memories of that bloodiest battle in the Pacific during World War II. For my father and for the other infantry veterans who returned to Okinawa in late June, 1995, to commemorate the battle’s 50th anniversary, there is scant evidence of the scale of tragedy that was here.

Okinawa: Remembering all the dead

This article first ran July 5, 1995 in the Towson Times and other Patuxent Publishing newspapers in Baltimore County. It is part of a package of four stories marking the 70th anniversary of the biggest battle of the war in the Pacific. Unlike some Okinawans, Masahide Ota does not want to forget the battle. In 1945, the 20-year-old Ota was mobilized as a member of the Blood and Iron Scouts for Japan’s emperor.

Okinawa: It was kill or be killed

This article first ran July 5, 1995 in the Towson Times and other Patuxent Publishing newspapers in Baltimore County. It is part of a package of four stories marking the 70th anniversary of the biggest battle of the war in the Pacific.

If you weren’t on Okinawa, you just won’t understand what went on there.

That’s how many of the veterans of the battle feel about their experiences, and why they’ve shared them so little, even with wives and children.