State Roundup, September 2, 2016

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LINING UP AGAINST HOGAN ORDER: Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker said in an interview on WBAL-AM Thursday that Gov. Larry Hogan’s executive order on school start dates didn’t just shut out legislators. It also shut out local concerns in favor of a one size fits all solution.

HOGAN, OTHERS DEFEND DECISION: publishes a press release issued by the governor’s office that is an unusual direct response to criticism found in news stories related to Gov. Larry Hogan’s order to begin the school year in 2017 after Labor Day.

  • Summer meets fall in September — when schools should open for the academic year. That’s the popular opinion among Princess Anne-area students and parents, who welcome Gov. Larry Hogan’s order to launch the school year in September after Labor Day. That’s even if a delayed start shortens winter or spring breaks or extends the academic year by a day or two, Gino Fanelli and Deborah Gates report in the Salisbury Daily Times.

DIVERSITY COMPLAINT OVER POT LICENSES: Leaders of the state’s medical marijuana commission are meeting with Attorney General Brian E. Frosh next week to figure out how to achieve more racial diversity when the panel awards licenses to companies to dispense the drug.  There are 811 applications for up to 94 dispensary licenses pending. They are being reviewed and ranked without regard for the identity of the applicants, reports Erin Cox in the Sun.

CHAIR DEFENDS PANEL: The chair of the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission has fired back at claims that the panel could and should have considered racial and ethnic diversity when reviewing applications to grow and process the plant, reports Daniel Leaderman for the Daily Record.

SCHUH ASKS RECONSIDERATON ON TRANSGENDER RULE: Anne Arundel County Executive Steve Schuh on Wednesday asked the Anne Arundel Board of Education to reconsider allowing transgender students to use bathrooms of their gender identity. In a letter to school board president Stacy Korbelak, Schuh  wrote that the guidelines infringed on the rights of students who may be uncomfortable sharing locker rooms or bathrooms with transgender students, writes Cindy Huang for the Annapolis Capital.